Sunday, December 20, 2009

May there be peace within


Mount Cheam Watercolour by Stephen Mullock copyright December 20, 2009

 
May there be peace within.
May you trust that you are exactly where you are meant to be.
May you not forget the infinite possibilities that are born of faith in yourself and others.
May you use the gifts that you have received, and pass on the love that has been given to you.
May you be content with yourself just the way you are.
Let this knowledge settle into your bones, and allow your soul the freedom to sing, dance, praise and love.
It is there for each and every one of us.
 
Derived from a prayer of St. Theresa
 
Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.

Copyright December 20, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Chilliwack Real Estate 2009 "How Bad Was It"

When you ask a question like "how bad was Chilliwack Real Estate in 2009" the response should be in comparison to what? In this post I look at the sales performance of single family detached houses in Chilliwack from January to today and compare it to the real estate market in the rest of the Fraser Valley (Abbotsford to Delta).  I could have compared it with other years but today I thought a look at another active market might make for more interesting reading as it sort of answers the question "how well are you doing with the market you have got"?




The above chart demonstrates pretty successfully that housing sale prices in the Chilliwack market when compared to sale prices in the Fraser Valley West area (Abbotsford to Delta) tend to rise and fall at similar rates like “water in a bathtub” rising or dropping all prices at the same time.

However, I have expressed a belief in previous posts that it seemed that the Fraser Valley Real Estate market was running away from a slow but steady Chilliwack market. It certainly has in terms of the number of sales, in 2008 the Chilliwack market accounted for 15% of the combined Fraser Valley market in single family detached housing. In 2009, to date that figure has dropped to 13 percent.

The average price spread has also changed with a 1.9% price advantage going to the dwellings in the Fraser Valley west area. These are small but significant numbers they mean that during the course of 2009 single family housing in the western Fraser Valley as compared to Chilliwack increased in value on average by almost $10,000.  The answer in part is of course demand the Chilliwack market has remained in a Buyers market veras the Fraser Valley has been enjoying a Balanced to Sellers market for the latter part of the year.

Why is there such a differnce? Is commuting to Chilliwack becoming less desirable with fuel costs? Media stories that cast Chilliwack in a poor light. The difficult year for employment that Chilliwack has had. The lack of Olympic spinoffs deeper in the Valley? If you have an answer let me know.


RULE OF THUMB




The Chilliwack average single family detached houses as a rule thumb are 2/3 the value of the average Fraser Valley single family detached house. That buys a lot of RRSPs, flat screen televisions, cars and holidays.

The analysis above is based on my interpretation of information provided by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board and does not take into account private sales. The term "Chilliwack" is used here quite loosely to refer to an area serviced by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board which includes communities such as Chilliwack, Agassiz, Harrison Hot Springs, Hope, Yale and Boston Bar. The Fraser Valley West area embraces the entire Fraser Valley Real Estate Board area which extends from Abbotsford to Delta.








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Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.



Copyright December 16, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

Cheam and the Great Ice Giant


Mount Cheam and Lady Peak (Dog Face)

I am still very much on the hunt for stories and legends about Mount Cheam the most dominant landmark in the eastern Fraser Valley.  Yesterday, I took the picture above and also dropped into the Agassiz Museum to see if they could provide me with some information about the angel legend.  Unfortunately, the ladies there could not help me much with this legend but they were helpful with other stories.  By the way, the Agassiz Museum is a terrific little small town museum well worth your time and visit - call ahead in the winter as there are limited hours of operation.



Agassiz Museum and former railway station

I found out that the peak is also known by the Pilalts indigenous people from the village at Cheam as See-am (Chief) Mountain.  That Cheam "wild strawberry place" is the name of a nearby Indian Village. There was also this story of a Great Ice Giant.

To quote from a Vancouver Sun article published in Jan. 1952 by L.R. Linton
The Pilats Indians called it Che-ahm, the Chief.  On its wooded slopes the Pilats picked berries, and tribe made offerings to appease the Great Ice Giant that hovered over Cheam.  Avalanches and snow slides used to hurl down its slopes bringing death and destruction, and the Indians believed the displeasure of the Great Ice Giant had been incurred."

The First Nation people of the area had reason to fear the mountain a slide from Cheam estimated to be 3 times as big as the Hope Slide buried a native village some 5,000 years ago.  This is the largest known catastrophic landslide in western Canada with debris fields 30m in depth.

Now the story of the existence of a Great Ice Giant (glacier) was discounted in that article in 1952 as a myth.  I however found something that would tend to support the idea of a glacier behind and above Mount Cheam and the evidence is in Spoon Lake.  In the photograph that follows you can see a small circular lake with a steep embankment as if something with a great deal of force had struck the earth.  When I saw this lake I thought meteorite but it may in fact be a kettle lake.  This is caused when a big chunk of ice surrounded by sediment falls from a great height then melts away leaving a depression and a lot of water. Imagine a big ball of ice bouncing higher and higher as it falls or a one becoming airbourne from a natural glacier made "ski jump".  Could Spoon Lake be the result of such an event falling from a Glacier perched on Lady Peak (Dog Face)?  If it is how old is the story about the Great Ice Giant.









$264,900!

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Tuesday, December 1, 2009

NOVEMBER 2009 CHILLIWACK HOUSE REPORT


Fall Twilight


Number of Chilliwack Houses Sold in November 2009 : 115

Number of Chilliwack Houses Sold Previous Month, October 2009:131



Average Chilliwack Sale Price- November 2009: $342,000

Average Chilliwack Sale Price - October 2009: $348,000

Average List to Average Sale Price ratio: 97 percent



Average Number of Days on Market: 61 days

Chilliwack Houses available for sale November 1, 2009: 740

Market: Buyer’s market



Graph: Chilliwack's Seasonal House Sale Activity



Comments



The strong market conditions in Vancouver and the western Fraser Valley (20% +) continue and the Chilliwack market is holding steady with a 15% sales to listing ratio. This means that the market is still in a Buyer market but is approaching a Balanced market. Mortgage monies are readily available at attractive rates. The graph above demonstrates a solid performance last month not far off the levels of 2007 and 2006. With respect to prices they dropped a little falling from an average of $348,000 in October to $342,000 in November.


The Abbotsford to Surrey area continues to post the best sales numbers in 4 years with 813 sales besting the 2006 sales numbers of 658 by quite a margin. There prices are edging upward and currently the average price of a single family detached home is $544,000 quite a difference over the Chilliwack average of $342,000. This variance of over $200,000 should make Chilliwack attractive for businesses considering a move as homes for staff are affordable.


Sellers: The market seems to be holding steady and prices are too. Lower priced homes are seeing a lot of activity; it is a good time to be a seller if you have a property priced under $300,000.



Buyers: The Buyer market conditions continue to favour your involvement there is plenty of inventory and attractive mortgage rates.


The analysis above is based on my interpretation of information provided by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board and does not take into account private sales. The term "Chilliwack" is used here quite loosely to refer to an area serviced by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board which includes communities such as Chilliwack, Agassiz, Harrison Hot Springs, Hope, Yale and Boston Bar.

If you enjoyed reading this article, why not Subscribe to be notified of the next one?

Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.  He would be happy to help you with your Chilliwack home selling or buying experience.

Copyright December 1, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Mount Cheam - The View from the Top


Mount Cheam from Agassiz

This post examines primarily in photographs the view from top of Mount Cheam and continues the theme explored in the last post of Cheam as a Wife to distance Mount Baker. There is a need to create a sense of “place” in the communities and Mount Cheam is the most prominent landmark in the eastern Fraser Valley; she deserved to be understood and appreciated.


The word “Cheam,” in Halkomelem, means “wild strawberries” and refers to the ridge comprising of Cheam and Lady (Dog Face) plus the lower slopes around Airplane Creek and Spoon Lake. This explanation, even though Cheam is a pretty sounding name, has always been a bit of a disappointment for me; I always hoped that the name would mean Mother or something like that more in keeping with the legend.



Lady aka Dog Face



Quite a number of years ago, I had a chance to climb to Mount Cheam’s summit and took some panoramic pictures of the trek. I hope you like them they show what you can expect if you ever decide to take the climb.


You cannot stay on the summit forever; you have to come down again. So why bother in the first place? Just this: What is above knows what is below, but what is below does not know what is above. One climbs, one sees. One descends, one sees no longer, but one has seen. There is an art of conducting oneself in the lower regions by the memory of what one saw higher up. When one can no longer see, one can at least still know. Rene Daumal



Mount Cheam looks along shoulder to husband Mount Baker






Younger Steve Mullock and Dog Face


Agassiz and Harrison Lake


Seabird Isalnd and Harrison Lake

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Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.



Copyright November 25, 2009 all pictures and content by Stephen Mullock.

Thursday, November 19, 2009

Mount Cheam Local Legend




The most beautiful mountain in the eastern Fraser Valley is Mount Cheam. This posting will discuss obsession with Mount Cheam, its legend, directions to climb and how to sound like a local when you pronounce Cheam.


The last first, Cheam is pronounced locally like “Shea-am” say it any other way and you will be giving yourself away as a non-resident. Try to blend in.

Mount Cheam has an elevation of 6929 Feet or 2,112 meters and is part of the Cheam range a subset of the Cascade Mountain Range. Look up from exit 135 on the Trans Canada Highway (Bridal Falls) and all you are seeing is Cheam. On a good day you will see the brightly coloured chutes of Para gliders floating around her shoulders. On poor days, clouds clinging to her forests. Broken cloud patterns spill unexpected light into crevasses as they sweep across the sky. This mountain has a million moods nearly all of them beautiful. A photographer friend of mine, Ian Meissner, says he has over 3900 pictures just of this mountain. That sort of fixation my friend is called an obsession. Ian’s pictures have been picked up by PBS amongst others give yourself a treat and have a look at his gallery.

A number of years ago I joined a group to climb the summit and take in the view. It was quite the journey a deeply rutted dirt road and then a fairly steep trail led to the top.  A more recent blog about the climb was written by John Harvey and has some great photographs. If you are in good health and have an appropriate vehicle it is a trip that I would recommend. Just remember to take plenty of water, good hiking boots and supplies for mishaps; directions to Mt.Cheam.


Legend : The First Nation legend is that Mount Cheam is the wife to a nearby and dormant volcano Mount Baker. Mount Baker is situated in Washington State, United States but can be seen by his wife in nearby Canada. The story I like comes from “Five Corners the Story of Chilliwack” by Bruce Ramsey as set down by Oliver Wells it says that they had three sons, Mount Hood, Mount Shasta and Mount Shuksan and three daughters who are younger than the boys.


Mt. Cheam to extreme left and Mt. Baker to right

Cheam got tired of being away from her people and left so that she could look after the Sto: Lo people “I ‘ll stand and guard the Staw-loh, that no harm comes to my people and no harm comes to the fish that come up to feed them”. With her went her three girls and she holds the smallest one I-oh-wat in her hand. The family dog officially called “Lady” but known by the locals as “Dog Face” followed her back as well. Once again try to blend it and call her “Dog-face”. It does actually look like a dog’s head. A second child east of her is not getting enough attention and her tears form”Bridal Veil” falls; the 6th highest falls in Canada. Isn't this a lovely legend worth knowing? I know it has changed my perspective of this grand "mother mountain".


"Dog Face" Explained

The next post will continue with Mount Cheam, a tragedy that occurred, an angel and a place of wild strawberries.

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Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.

Copyright November 19, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Monday, November 16, 2009

CHILLIWACK HOUSE SALES Mid-Month November 1-15, 2009


Harrison Lake with Echo Island

Chilliwack Housing Market remains steady



Sale numbers of Chilliwack single family detached houses in the first 15 days of November are looking relatively good. Of course, if you want to compare them to the first 15 days in November 2008 they would be fantastic. In the November 1-15th period of 2008 there were a mere 18 single family detached sales in all of the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board this year there are 63. That 63 figure is a respectable number, even 2 more than the first two weeks of October 2009.  It is a good sign that the Chilliwack market is continuing to strengthen.


Fraser Valley West Housing Market weakens



The Fraser Valley real estate market (Abbotsford to Delta) has been hot in recent months but a quick look at the numbers for this month shows that it may be slowing down to its seasonal pattern with fewer sales taking place in the fall and winter months. They show 389 sales of single family detached houses for the first two weeks of this month compared to 477 for the first two weeks of October the month before. A decline of about 19%, still plenty of month is left we will have to see if this pattern holds.


The Statistics – November 1-15, 2009



Buyer’s market 15% sales to listing ratio

Number of Houses Sold first 15 days November 2009: 63


Number of Houses Sold first 15 days of October 2009: 61



Average Sale Price Previous Month- October: $348,000


Average List to Average Sale Price ratio: 97 percent


Average Number of Days on Market: 64 days


Houses available for sale October 15th: 806

The best advantage for a buyer or seller is the expertise and knowledge of a real estate agent who is active and works the neighbourhood you are interested in.

The analysis above is based on my interpretation of information provided by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board and does not take into account private sales. The term "Chilliwack" is used here quite loosely to refer to an area serviced by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board which includes communities such as Chilliwack, Agassiz, Harrison Hot Springs, Hope, Yale and Boston Bar.

Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.

Copyright November 16, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Thursday, November 12, 2009

2010 Housing Outlook CMHC



“What a difference a year makes” exclaimed Carol Frketich, B.C. Regional Economist, Monday at the 15th Annual CMHC Housing Outlook. Was there ever a bigger understatement to describe the crazy world of  the B.C. Housing market?

A year ago, the financial markets were in a state of shambles bringing the world economy to its knees ending retirement and employment dreams alike. Things have improved but the lasting vestige of an economy racked with high unemployment (8.2%) and underemployment remain.

I was at the Outlook Conference in search of a couple of answers: 1. where are interest rates and hence mortgage rates heading, should my Chilliwack real estate clients look to lock in or not, and 2. in which direction was the market heading, in particular the Chilliwack real estate market, will there be price increases and how large will they be?

The answers are NO and Who Knows.



With enough graphs, charts and numbers to choke an actuarial expert CMHC took to the stage and I dutifully filled my notebook. For you my reader, I have distilled the highlights into this single blog.

Bright Spots

1. The housing market has/will rebounded (but the signals are still mixed) supported by:

• Broad Economic Growth

• Low Mortgage Rates

• Strong Resale Market

• Increased Housing Starts

2. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in B.C. for 2010 is expected to be in the 2 to 3.5% range

3. Mortgage rates will remain low but expect a moderate increase in mid 2010, up .25%

4. Metro Vancouver, Victoria and the western sections of the Fraser Valley all have sellers markets the remainder of the province has a balanced market ( I do not agree with this totally, but okay)

5. Housing prices nationally are increasing but at a modest pace and will stabilize in 2010 particularly after interest rates increase (see point 3)



The Shaky Bits:

1. There is still a negative saving rate in B.C. – what the hell? In contrast to a national savings rate of about 4% the average B.C. resident is dipping into savings or living on credit at -2%. Does this sound sustainable?

2. Did I mention B.C.’s 8.2% unemployment rate?

3. Affordability remains an issue. The average weekly wage rate in British Columbia for British Columbia was $808.81 or an annual income of $42,068. To buy an average valued single family house a buyer with a 25% down payment, taking a conventional 25 year loan having a 5 year term the buyer(s) needs an annual income of:

• Metro Vancouver - $150,000

• Fraser Valley - $92,000

They did not look at Chilliwack real estate but using the same parameters, my best guess is this:

• Chilliwack - $71,000

4. The Canadian dollar is strengthening against the U.S. dollar this will affect exports and jobs. On the bright side, more and more of our production is heading to China.



One of the more interesting parts of the CMHC presentation was the work that they are doing with sustainable housing as presented by Lance Jakubec CMHC researcher. Certainly this work is important but it will need to be tried, tested and then incorporated into the building code to have any lasting significance.

More about CMHC and its many fine services can be found at CMHC.

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Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.



Copyright November 12, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Thursday, November 5, 2009

Assessments how reliable are they?




It isn’t uncommon to be asked when showing buyers real estate in the Chilliwack area “What is the property’s assessed value”. Buyers view assessments as a useful tool but should it be relied upon?

I usually answer this sort of Buyer inquiry that the assessment are made as of July 1st and as a result may be higher or lower depending on a number of factors including: the market strength in Chilliwack, the time since the assessor last looked at the property and the individual characteristics of the real estate.

This month, I decided to have a look even though many Chilliwack real estate properties have not been assessed since 2008 or 2007. This research looks at the October 2009 Multiple Listing Sales (MLS) of single family detached homes in the City of Chilliwack and compares them to their corresponding assessment value.

My thought was that if the assessments were within 5 % of the Chilliwack market that would be a pretty rule of thumb guide – the results were surprising.

Real estate in Chilliwack, and in the rest of the province of British Columbia for that matter, is valued by the BC Assessment which is a provincial Crown corporation governed by a Board of Directors. The job is a massive one given the number of property titles in the province. Personally, I hold the assessment authority in high regard having come to know many assessment people through the Real Estate Institute of British Columbia which confers a professional designation on those dedicated enough to fulfill a demanding UBC education and gaining the necessary experience required.



Note: If you are ever looking for a real estate professional in British Columbia check to see if they have either in the initials RI or RI(B.C.) behind their name. They are the professionals you need. Many assessment people also have an Appraisal Institute of Canada (AIC) designation.



So what were the results?



The Chilliwack real estate area in the month of October 2009 had 131 single family detached sales as discussed in the last posting. Now, not all of these could be used. First Nation lands and newly built homes are not assessed. I also excluded properties in Hope and homes with acreage large enough to apply for a farmland exemption. This whittled down the sample size to 94. Not a bad sample size.

These 94 Chilliwack single family homes sold for a total of $34,672,791 and were assessed for $34,346,000.

In short, the assessments in aggregate were within

1%

of the total sale price value of Chilliwack single family homes sold in the month of October 2009!


Wow! I was quite surprised and pleased for the BC Assessment as well. This sort of result suggests that the Chilliwack assessors are doing a pretty great job.

Now, this does not mean that all assessments were within 1% of the sale price, to the contrary, there were wild swing on some properties, in particular, those with unique characteristics or located in more rural setting where market evidence is difficult to find. In one case, a property sold for $200,000 more than assessed value and in another for $86,900 less.


Of the 94 sales sampled, 48 properties sold for less than their assessed value, 42 sold for more and 4 were right on the money. The caution is, do not take the assessment value as being anything more than it is a great aggregate valuation process. Hire a local professional real estate person to answer any questions you might have about your specific property value in the Chilliwack area.

If you have any questions about your Chilliwack assessed value I would recommend that you go to the BC Assessment site.

The analysis above is based on my interpretation of information provided by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board and does not take into account private sales. The term "Chilliwack" is used here quite loosely to refer to an area serviced by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board which includes communities such as Chilliwack, Agassiz, and Harrison Hot Springs.

Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.

Copyright November 5, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Sunday, November 1, 2009

October 2009 CHILLIWACK HOUSE REPORT


Backyard Colour - Maple Tree

Number of Chilliwack Houses Sold in October 2009 : 131

Number of Chilliwack Houses Sold Previous Month, September 2009 :124



Average Chilliwack Sale Price- October 2009 : $348,000

Average Chilliwack Sale Price - September 2009 : $345,000



Average List to Average Sale Price ratio : 97 percent

Average Number of Days on Market : 71 days



Chilliwack Houses available for sale November 1, 2009 :818




Market: Buyer’s market








Graph: Chilliwack's Seasonal House Sale Activity


Comments





The sale surges in Vancouver and the western Fraser Valley continue and at last it seems that Chilliwack market is responding somewhat from this “ripple” effect as sales activity generally flow easterly through the Fraser Valley. This is best demonstrated in the above graph which shows that the number of single family detached sales in October 2009 were the second best in the past four years. Even the seasonal shape of the graph has been defied somewhat; usually we would have expected fewer sales than in the month before. With respect to prices they are holding firm around an average of $348,000.



The Abbotsford to Surrey area continues to post the best sales numbers in 4 years with 900 sales besting the 2007 sales numbers of 798 by quite a margin. There prices are edging upward and currently the average price of a single family detached home is $542,000 quite a difference over the Chilliwack average of $348,000. This almost $200,000 variance should make Chilliwack attractive as a retirement location as people can cash out and maybe even put a few dollars in the bank.

Sellers: The market seems to be improving and prices are holding firm but it is still a buyers market. Lower priced homes are seeing a lot of activity; it is a good time to be a seller if you have a property priced under $300,000.

Buyers: The Buyer market conditions continue to favour your involvement there is plenty of inventory and attractive mortgage rates.



The analysis above is based on my interpretation of information provided by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board and does not take into account private sales. The term "Chilliwack" is used here quite loosely to refer to an area serviced by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board which includes communities such as Chilliwack, Agassiz, Harrison Hot Springs, Hope, Yale and Boston Bar.

If you enjoyed reading this article, why not Subscribe to be notified of the next one?

Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.



Copyright November 1, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Friday, October 30, 2009

Agassiz’s Agricultural Area Plan - Part 2



Agassiz Farmland

On October 28th, I attended the first public meeting called to get input from the public on the District of Kent (Agassiz) Draft Agricultural Area Plan.  Arriving late, I found the Public Open House hosted in the Agricultural Hall attended mainly by the document creators, Mayor, Council, the farming community, a developer and a scattering of residents; in short, a nice group of concerned citizens and respected members of the community.

Since reading the Plan I have to admit I swing from admiration of the scope of the plan to fear that it is too focused on the farming community and lacking sufficient input by other non-farmer groups.  Back to the Public Open House, there eventually was a question period and I gave my two-cents worth with the suggestion that more stakeholders need to be involved as the policies outlined in this document will clearly affect the town site (even individual titles) and the revenues of the District of Kent.

Mayor Lorne Fisher informed me that they had been all along looking for such stakeholder involvement but usually it is only at time of printing do they get the interest of people like me. What to say.  It must be a frustrating experience to spend countless hours on this type of project only then to have "people like me" start in with the questions.  I have to admit I am, maybe like a lot of people, operating on autopilot most days (and in front of my laptop like those pilots in the news) somewhat oblivious to what is going on in the world.  I do feel his pain though, overall, this a remarkable plan why poke it in the eye? Then again, why have a Public Open House at all?

He also told he that there was going to be a 2 week period in which more input could be sought. I am not sure this is good enough but it is what it is. 

As the current District of Kent Council is dominated by people either living, working or associated with the farming community I believe it would be in the Council's best interests to have this document vetted through something other than the limited lens being offered.  How to do this?  Assemble a non-farmer stakeholder groups to work together and make suggestion with the assistance of hired planning resources.

If you think this is a good idea be sure to let Mayor Lorne Fisher and the planner Don Cameron know. Don can contacted don.cameron@telus.net  or by phone toll free at 1.888.535.5282. Mayor Lorne Fisher at the District Hall 604-796-2235.




Thursday, October 29, 2009

Agassiz’s Agricultural Area Plan





Resting Cattle


To Clap Hands or Hold Your Nose – That is the Question


The District of Kent is in the process to creating a document that may affect your title if you live in Town of Agassiz or have a Rural zoning and certainly it will confer financial benefits to the farming community; some needed and others that should be questioned. My suggestion is that you read the document and make up your own mind. There is a 2 week period in which the District is looking for further input and so time is short – do it today if you can. If you have any thoughts or concerns either send them to the Mayor or to Donald Cameron don.cameron@telus.net .

The Agricultural Area Plan (AAP) is an important document that either will become a sub-plan, or get appended to, the next official community plan OCP (2010) and serves as a guide for development within the District of Kent. What can it affect? If a rezoning for a piece of land in the AAP area is being sought by an owner, the District will look to see how this conforms to the AAP and may discard the submission if it does not meet the requirements. It can also take away zoning, provide for the densification in some semi-rural settings, it can look to consolidate smaller parcels into larger ones. It asks that a covenant be placed on all residences in the Town of Agassiz conpelling residents to recognize farm odours as a normal way of life. What impact will such a covenant have on the marketability of our Agassiz properties? Would buyers think such a “red flag” convenant an unusual warning inhibiting sales and reducing prices?

Don't get me wrong, this type of planning is a needed and good thing it is just that the consequences of a plan like this have a habit of catching up to the residents only after it has been approved by Council. Now is the time to have a look at it and decide for yourself whether you like it or not.

Now for a bit of a game, try to find the "Agricultural Area Plan" on the District of Kent website. Go to http://www.district.kent.bc.ca/ and attempt to find the document in three clicks.
Tired of the “Website Frustration” game it is here Agricultural Area Plan.

Have a look, it is time to let your opinion be known whether it be clapping your hands or holding your nose.

Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.

Copyright October 29, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Friday, October 23, 2009

Gaining Ground: Getting Ready for the Storm



Fall and Hopyard Mountain, Agassiz BC

Not every day has a blue sky but nearly everyday has something spectacular to express.  Look for it.  This attempt of mine sought to capture a small grouping of  fall trees mid field hunkered down against a threatening sky. I hope you can smell the maple leaves, feel the coming rain and rejoice for a moment in the dance of transformation. 

Click on the picture for a better look.




Gaining Ground and Getting Ready for the Storm


It is appropriate that the picture above shows the world once again in a seasonal decline hunkering down before a threatening sky because that was the tone of the message I received from the Gaining Ground Resilient Cities Conference held in Vancouver, BC this past week.  Climate change and the end-of-oil were the Big storm clouds as explained by scientist Dr. Bill Rees.  Pretty scary stuff but to cope a phrase, I found that "green shots" were also popping up in the most unexpected places. Places that were devasted like the Bronx in New York and North Charleston reinvented with love,caring and a hell of a lot of work. This post looks at how these planetary forces will, briefly, come to change our world the winter we are facing together and the promise of spring.

It is easy to disregard the slowly emerging facts that our world is in a transformative process and pretend that it does not exist. I'll admit that is where my head was until this conference.  Why do we discount these threats?  I am reminded of how you go about boiling a frog - that by placing the frog into pot of cold water and then slowly raising the temperature of the stove under the pot. That is what may be happening to us but instead of the heat of an appliance we are facing the slow increase of fuel costs and the amplifying volatility of weather.  Is this happening locally, Chilliwack broke numerous heat records this year plus we had the hottest day ever recorded on July 29, 2009 of 39.2 degrees celsius!  So, in short yes.

With respect to the end of oil, think back to 2008 and recall that the stock market meltdown was preceded by the costs of oil reaching new heights albeit somewhat speculative in nature.  There is a great book on the end of oil situation that I would recommended reading, it is "Why Your World Is About to Get a Whole Lot Smaller" by Jeff Rubin, a fellow Canadian. If you remain unconvicted just go and gas up.

Al Gore's movie An Inconvenient Truth is readily available at most video stores and will give you the overview needed there.  That is where I want to leave this part of the discussion because it is more important to not get blinded into a sense of immobility by the immensity of these issues. We need to ak ourselves "what can we do" and "what can I do"?





Mount Cheam Brillant Sunrise






What can be done?



Do what you can and keep doing it.


Green Shoots


 
The conference was a great place to meet and chat with people and it gave me a sense of what the "do what you can" might include.  Talking with Karen C. I learned that several blocks in her East Vancouver neighbourhood had organized themselves to share resources and support each other.  We will not be able to solve these huge problems without each other.  I think the street level is a great place to start.  The best part though, was this,  Karen gave me a sense that people were enjoying each others company and that this was adding depth to their lives.  Why not get together with your neighbours?  Carpool.  Talk amongst yourselves, organize, we need to bring more people into the conversation.

A couple of ladies in Sardis did something they had not done for years this summer they dug and planted a garden.  By September they had more vegetables than they knew what to do with.  By the way, Marie, if you are reading this thanks again.  Again, a shared experience; their produce did not have to be trucked in on a carbon trail and how much fresher can it get than today's harvest?  So, think ahead to 2010 where can you plant a garden?

Look to resources in your own backyard and neighbourhood.

Vote with your wallet, support businesses that purchase local.  Ask your restaurant where their produce comes from and chose business that are buying from the local farmers. Did you know that every dollar that a local farmer earns can get multiplied in the local economy as much as 5 times?  If you know the farmer ask them where they make their purchases.  Think about what other products made locally could be purchased - good for the economy and avoids those nasty shipping carbon emissions. If we can build a diverse economy we can build a more resilient community one thar can face up to the challenges ahead.

Despite the heavy tone of the conference I am encouraged by the "budding" of green shoots I see and the resilience of everyday people,like you and me, they give me hope that regardless of the winter to come, a spring will follow.

Best quote I heard at the conference: "there is no elevator to sustainability you have to use the stairs".

Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.




Copyright October 23, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.



Friday, October 16, 2009

CHILLIWACK HOUSE SALES MID-MONTH - October 2009

You will likely soon read some celebratory nonsense about how the Chilliwack real estate market is 33% more active than it was in 2008. This will be a true statement, but then, October 2008 is not much of a benchmark. A year ago, the Chilliwack real estate market was a real stinker. Granted a 33% increase does sound good, but, the real story is quite the opposite, the Chilliwack real estate market seems to be an underachiever, especially, when it is compared with the real estate market in the Fraser Valley west of Chilliwack or Vancouver.

I know that the glass is half full and reasonable market conditions are at play, houses are selling, regularly, I was just hoping that, hey, the glass might become ¾’s full.

You could take some comfort in the fact that house sales in the Chilliwack Real Estate Board area are continuing to follow a seasonal pattern that is again, if it wasn’t for those rebounding sales happening next door in the western section of the Fraser Valley. Chilliwack house sales of 61 for the first two weeks of October are less than those in the first two weeks of September when we had 70 sales. In the western Fraser Valley (FV-west) sales have more than rebounded they are 25% higher than a month earlier! Things there are accelerating. OMG! They are looking at the highest number of sales in the past 5 years. My estimation is that close to 1 in 4 houses are selling each month in the FV-wast as compared to the Chilliwack average of 1 in 7.

Chilliwack real estate sales should be higher and so the advantage remains with the buyers. They continue to be in a great position to snap up a smart bargain.


The Statistics – October 1-15, 2009





Buyer’s market



Number of Houses Sold first 15 days October 2009: 61



Number of Houses Sold first 15 days of September 2009: 70



Average Sale Price Previous Month- September: $345,000



Average List to Average Sale Price ratio: 97 percent



Average Number of Days on Market: 65 days



Houses available for sale October 15th: 866

If you would like to read an article on the broader resale housing outlook, I quite enjoyed the TD Economic Report of October 7, 2009.

Real estate markets move too fast to rely upon a once a month analysis, this mid-month report will give real estate buyers and sellers a more immediate and better understanding of the market and the knowledge they need to hold a competitive advantage.

The best advantage for a buyer or seller is the expertise and knowledge of a real estate agent who is active and works the neighbourhood you are interested in.  Hire them do not take advantage of them.  Okay, that sounded bitter.

Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Chilliwack Eagle Landing Walmart Expansion

 


Eagle Landing - Oct. 2009

Just in case you missed this story the Chilliwack Progress reported that a massive 150,000 square foot Walmart is to be developed within the Eagle Land Retail Centre which is located on Squiala First Nation Land. Walmart has been rumoured to have been looking for a successful site for some time but large parcels have been hard to find due in part to the Agricultural Land Reserve constraints. The ALR regulations do not apply to First Nation Lands as they fall under federal and not provincial jurisdiction.

The Eagle Land Retail Centre accessible from the new Evans Road flyover (nearing completion) will consist of approximately 600,000 square feet of retail space in an unenclosed shopping centre. Cineplex Entertainment announced last week that they would be building an 8 theatre complex with a footprint of 31,000 square feet.



My View: First off I am pleased for the Squiala First Nation it looks to me that they have struck a fair bargain that will no doubt provide much needed funds and future employment opportunities for the band.

Speaking of employment, I wonder if an extension of the industrial capacity started just south along Yale Road West would have produced better paying industrial jobs. I can not imagine that retail businesses will be paying much more than minimum wages and be staffed with a lot of part time workers.  From a real estate point of view, I wonder if these jobs will provide enough income to purchase a home and pay the mortgage.

Chilliwack already has a Walmart at the Chilliwack Mall and 6 screens are available between the Paramount in downtown Chilliwack and the Cottonwood 4 in Sardis, so there is no real advantage here other than newer and bigger.  Competing businesses will be impacted and for some, on the edge of bankruptcy, this will be the push.

They have talked for years about redeveloping the downtown core of Chilliwack this will be a setback.  The marvellous boutique businesses found today in downtown Chilliwack are simply going to have become more marvellous.  They do provide a welcomed alternative to most products offered by Walmart but they will need to focus on how they can offset the price advantage of an aggressive multinational company.  It can be done and because a Walmart already exists in Chilliwack there maybe less work than a quick glance would suggest.

In short, this type of “drive to commercial sprawl” reflects the continued emphasis on large box store development to the determent of older commercial areas and better paying industrial opportunities.

That’s my take, what do you think?

Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.




Copyright October 14, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Sunday, October 11, 2009

Launch of New Children's Book - "Dude"





Emily Mullock Illustrator



In case some of you are wondering when the second book penned by Christopher Aslan and illustrated by, our daughter, Emily Mullock is due out you will be relieved to learn that the wait is over.  "Dude" portrays a young dude's emotional journey through everyday life... each pictures starts with a bit of a mystery, "what is Dude feeling?  It is a great way to talk about the social context of everyday life with the youngster in your life.

As you can see in the announcement above there will be a book signing at "antisocial" a skateboard shop located at 2337 Main Street, Vancouver, BC on October 20, 2009 starting at 6:30 pm.  If you plan to come, please RSVP to jenna@benjaminbrownbooks.com.  Emily will be there and I am sure she would be happy to see a few familiar faces.

The complete catalogue of Benjamin Brown Books can be found at http://www.benjaminbrownbooks.com/ including the first book illustrated by Emily Mullock also written by the talented Christopher Aslan called  "Wenda the Wacky Wiggler".

You can also check out Emily's "Blog of M"  with a simple click or Google "Emily Mullock" for more of her fine creations.

Emily is responsible for the caricature that I use on this blog - it looks just like me except that I have greyer hair. :-)

Now I realize that this posting has little to do with the intention of this site except in a loose cultural sense so please indulge me.

Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.




Copyright October 11, 2009 by Stephen Mullock except graphic.

Thursday, October 8, 2009

New Web Address for Blog


Moon and Mount Cheam - Nov/2005

What's in a name?  Well when that name or web address is http://www.chilliwackbcrealestate.blogspot.com/ it is clearly one that is way too long.  Like they would say in the film "Mary Poppins" it is "something quite atrocious".  Input the address incorrectly, and, you find website purgatory; you're somewhere but not where you want to be.  Then, when you try to find your way out of website purgatory, there seems to be a million "Chilliwack" websites.  Yes, we have all been there.  It is also a mouthful to say let alone expect anyone to remember.

So this site has a new address, that is easier to recall, http://www.frasercheam.com/ .  Area residents will recognize this word combination as a common description for the Upper Fraser Valley.  In fact, all the communities that I work in as a local real estate agent representative are parts of a regional district once known as the Fraser Cheam Regional District before it was amalgated to become today's Fraser Valley Regional District.  The old address of http://www.chilliwackbcrealestate.blogspot.com/ will work fine as well so you will not have to change your bookmark.

The masthead at the top of the page shows the connection between the Fraser River and Mount Cheam and they share a story to be written about in a later blog.  It is one of my favourites.




Blonde Joke - New Windows


Last year I replaced all the windows in my house with that expensive double-pane energy efficient kind.

Today, I got a call from the contractor who installed them. He was complaining that the work had been completed a whole year ago and I still hadn't paid for them.
Helloooo... just because I'm blonde doesn't mean that I am automatically stupid. So, I told him just what his fast talking sales guy had told me last year, that in ONE YEAR these windows would pay for themselves! Helloooo... it's been a year, I told him.

There was only silence at the other end of the line, so I finally just hung up. He never called back. I bet he felt like an idiot.


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Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.

Copyright October 8, 2009 by Stephen Mullock except for the joke which was sent to me.

Monday, October 5, 2009

Between the Bridges: The Agassiz – Rosedale Bridge

My “Between the Bridges” part of the blog examines that area north of the Fraser River between the Mission Bridge and the Agassiz-Rosedale Bridge in the upper Fraser Valley of British Columbia. Previous “Between the Bridges” posts have looked at the Kilby Museum and the Harrison Mills area.


Agassiz - Rosedale Bridge looking north


The Agassiz – Rosedale Bridge was built in 1956 during the W.A.C. Bennett years replacing a ferry that had provided a crossing service for many years.


Fraser River View of Agassiz - Rosedale Bridge

It is hard to believe, but the merchants of Agassiz opposed the bridge proposal, largely championed by the Chilliwack Board of Trade as early as 1910, with the result that another 46 years would pass before its opening. What were the merchants of Agassiz thinking? That the local residents would drive across the bridge in search of better prices?  Or were they just resistant to change?

Anyways, I drive across it almost daily and think it is beautiful and the landscape as well. The Fraser River in a late evening light; the farms of Agassiz so green and pastoral; the Coastal Mountains; and of course Mount Cheam. I took a walk across the bridge a couple a weeks ago and snapped these pictures. I hope you like them and that they convey to you the beauty I see.


Gateway to Agassiz

Bicyclist Beware

Under the Bridge Canopy

Long shadows on Farmland

Fraser River

Sunset on Sandbars

Bridge Under Structure

Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of local real estate experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.

Copyright October 5, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Friday, October 2, 2009

September 2009 Chilliwack Real Estate Townhouse/Apartment Market Review


Sales of Townhouses and Apartments


Stephen Mullock Analysis
Chilliwack and District Real Estate Market


Units Sold each Month 2006 - 2009

Number of Chilliwack Townhouses/Apartments Sold: 66


Number of Chilliwack Units Sold Previous Month: 67


Average Sale Price of Townhouses and Apartments: $219,000

Average Sale Price Previous Month: $211,000


Average List to Average Sale Price ratio: 97 percent

Townhouses/Apartments available for sale at the month's end: 489




Market: Buyers market




Comments


Sales of strata townhouses and apartments were similar to the month before and pretty respectable when compared to 2006, 2007and 2008.

Prices on an over month basis seem to have edged upward but there is a fair amount of variation in any month on a longer term prices look relatively flat.  If you are wondering what your property is worth I would suggest contacting a local real estate professional or me.

This market remains in buyer market territory with only 13% of available listings selling in the given month.
The real estate market between Abbotsford and Surrey is stronger and remains in balanced market territory. Western Fraser Valley sales in September 2009 were the highest in the 2006-2009 periods. 

Prices in the western Fraser Valley have edged upward to $282,000 which when compared to the Chilliwack average of $211,000 is a larger spread than what would normally be the case suggesting a price advantage should be given to Chilliwack.
Sellers: There remains a lot of competition for buyers in the market; sellers should be prepared to be flexible in negotiations.
Buyers:This Buyer market favours your purchase with an ample supply of properties to chose from, good mortgage rates and some flexibility on price.
The analysis above is based on my interpretation of information provided by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board and does not take into account private sales. The term "Chilliwack" is used here quite loosely to refer to an area serviced by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board which includes communities such as Chilliwack, Agassiz, Harrison Hot Springs, Hope, Yale and Boston Bar.

If you enjoyed reading this article, why not Subscribe to be notified of the next one?

Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.


Copyright October 2, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Thursday, October 1, 2009

Chilliwack Real Estate September 2009 House Sale Report




September 2009 - Chilliwack House Sale Report


Number of Chilliwack Houses Sold in September 2009 : 124
Number of Chilliwack Houses Sold Previous Month, August 2009 :136

Average Chilliwack Sale Price- September 2009 : $345,000
Average Chilliwack Sale Price - August 2009 : $357,000


Average List to Average Sale Price ratio : 97 percent

Average Number of Days on Market : 72 days

Chilliwack Houses available for sale October 1, 2009 :851


Market: Buyer’s market



Graph: Chilliwack's Seasonal House Sale Activity

Comments



With recent sale surges in Vancouver and the western Fraser Valley I had hopes that Chilliwack market would soon be a benefactor of good times from a “ripple” effect as sales activity generally flow easterly through the Fraser Valley. This has not happened and I am wondering why? The Abbotsford to Surrey area continues to post the best sales numbers in 4 years with increases of over 25%. There prices are edging upward. In contrast the sale of houses in Chilliwack while much improved over the results in 2008 is more or less in keeping of what I would expect for this time of year but performing poorer when compared to the sale numbers of 2006 and 2007. It could be that the Chilliwack market is being negatively affected by a number of factors: (1) higher fuel costs, (2) prices, are they too high, and (3) news stories that portray Chilliwack in a negative light due to criminal activity. Any ideas let me know - this is weird.



On another issue, Sellers should not be dismayed by the downward change in the September average sales price if anything the August sales average price of $357,000 was higher than it should have been and without a couple of higher priced sales in August would have been much lower. It should be noted that the average in July was also about $345,000 indicating to me that prices are holding firm if anything through this period.
Sellers: Now, would be a good time to review your pricing strategy as you will be competing for fewer buyers in coming months.

Buyers: The Buyer market conditions continue to favour your involvement there is plenty of inventory and attractive mortgage rates.

The analysis above is based on my interpretation of information provided by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board and does not take into account private sales.  The term "Chilliwack" is used here quite loosely to refer to an area serviced by the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board which includes communities such as Chilliwack, Agassiz, Harrison Hot Springs, Hope, Yale and Boston Bar.

If you enjoyed reading this article, why not Subscribe to be notified of the next one?
Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.

Copyright October 1, 2009 by Stephen Mullock.

Monday, September 28, 2009

Garrison Crossing Part 2 – Garrison Crossing takes a fitness test

This post is part 2 of a series that examines how Canada Land Corporation has transformed Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Chilliwack into one of Chilliwack’s most sought after real estate addresses. To find Part one  just a click away or scroll downward on the page. This post will appeal to area residents, those interested in urban development, people considering a real estate purchase in the residential portion of Garrison Crossing, Chilliwack and others like the Mullock family that lived on the Base.


Boulevard Houses September 2009

Garrison Crossing – Physical Fitness – 5BX



When I was a boy growing up on the Base the Royal Canadian 5BX Plan for Physical Fitness was the preeminent daily guide to wellbeing. So, just for fun, I hope to answer what 5 physical attributes of Garrison Crossing are keys to its fitness for habitation.

1-X Floodplain


The first is that it is situated above the 200 year floodplain. The last major flood in the Fraser Valley was in 1948, and while there was serious flooding in the lower parts of the Greendale area as recently as January 2009, the 1948 flood is the one seared into the memories of the old-timers here. Lucky for Chilliwack that the military base established in 1942 ,was on lands above the flooding, and available to give assistance in 48. Today, Chilliwack is better protected by dykes but who knows? New housing in Chilliwack has been required to meet the 200 year floodplain requirements for some time but in the case of Garrison Crossing the elevation is so high that even in-ground basements are allowed.

Fitness level: Excellent



2-X Fertile


The second, is that the rich fertile soil of the Fraser Valley provides a lush albeit seasonal growing environment. With ideas like the 100 mile diet floating around a small family garden is not such a bad idea. The land is relatively level providing a great walking environment or place to kick a ball around with a child.

Fitness Level: Very Good


3-X Climate


One of the most moderate climates in British Columbia and Canada (as defined by a deviation from a 15 degree Celsius day) is the third, it once provided a wonderful year round climate for military training, today, it offers a comfortable temperature for its inhabitants.  Having said that the hottest day ever recorded for Chilliwack occurred this July so maybe weather patterns are changing. Okay, I feel that I have to also mention rain. There I have said it – rain. Nothing is perfect but it keeps the trees beautifully green and does not need shovelling.

Fitness Level: Very Good, with an umbrella in winter


4-X General Movement






Transportation.  Tucked in the southern section of today’s City of Chilliwack adjacent to Vedder Crossing the Base must have been somewhat isolated when it opened in 1942. Vedder road, to the east, today, is the major thoroughfare to the Shopping areas in Sardis and the City of Chilliwack from Garrison Crossing and this is a very busy road. The result is congestion.
The good news is that the new Evans Road highway overpass, to the northwest, now under construction and nearing completion, will likely benefit Garrison Crossing more than almost any other area in Chilliwack moving its current "Fair" fitness level for vehicular traffic upward. A bus service is also available.
A short 25 minute drive takes you to the Abbotsford International Airport and commercial airlines like WestJet.  There is also a small Chilliwack Municipal Airport for smaller aircraft.
We will see in future posts that the Garrison Crossing development is a pedestrian friendly community where people can work live and play; to some degree limiting the need for a car.

Fitness Level: Fair Improving to Average within one year, Good within 5 years.

Cheam Centre Design

5-X Extra Play Availability



This area is rich in natural amenities to explore. The Chilliwack River /Vedder Canal offer white water rafting and fishing. The Blue Herron Reserve walking and biking trails right along the Vedder canal. Cultus Lake is 20 minutes away. There are 9 golf courses within 45 minutes. The Cheam fitness/pool centre is located within Garrison Crossing and is under renovation and expansion.

Fitness Level: Good Improving to Excellent within one year.


Summary


In conclusion, Garrison Crossing gets a passing grade quite easily on the physical side. The next post about Garrison Crossing, Chilliwack will explore the historical linkage.



If you are curious as to what residences are available for sale in Garrison Crossings as of this date click here.

Garrison Crossing Part 3: Historical or Hysterical


You can imagine that the thousands of soldiers and their offspring have an attachment to and are quite sensitive to how the Base might be developed. In part, this is due to a military life steep in tradition and always aware of the debt of those in the service before them. Even years after my father retired, frail and elderly, he would be invited to special Base openings, a chauffeur would be sent to pick him up and return him home. Now, if they do that for one man, imagine the collective sentiments for Base life. This was the time bomb that Canada Land Corporation inherited along with the site and the subject of the next post.





Coming Up Next: Chilliwack Real Estate Sale Statistics: The Month of September 2009 in Review






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Stephen Mullock is a Chilliwack real estate associate broker with 29 years of experience. He can be reached at Royal LePage Wheeler Cheam Realty, telephone 604-792-0077.



Copyright September 28, 2009 by Stephen Mullock; especially those stick men drawings!